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Basic List of Freshwater Plant Species for an Aquarium

A list of freshwater aquarium plant species can help aquarists in determining the right plant species for their freshwater tank. There are numerous plant species available that have distinct characteristics and values. Here is a listing of basic freshwater plant species for an aquarium.

Introduction

A list of freshwater aquarium plant species can help aquarists in determining the right plant species for their freshwater tank. There are numerous plant species available that have distinct characteristics and values. Here is a listing of basic freshwater plant species for an aquarium.

Hornwort

The Hornwort, with a scientific name of Ceratophyllum, is common in ponds, streams and marshes in tropical regions. It grows completely submerged in water but not always floating on the water surface. Hornwort cannot survive drought. It produces bright green and narrow leaves along the nodes of its stems. It has no roots but at times it develops leaves that have a root-like appearance, anchoring the Hornwort to the bottom. Hornwort flowers are too small and will not attract attention.

Hornworts are fixtures of freshwater aquarium given its appearance and ability to produce high oxygen levels. Many Hornwort plants float just under the surface of the waters, providing protection to fishes spawning, as well as snails. It also helps in obstructing the growth of algae by screening lighting.

Water Trumpet

The water trumpet is a watering plant with a scientific name of Cryptocoryne. It is found in the tropics most notably the regions of Southeast Asia and New Guinea, where about 60 different species are found. It typically lives in the rivers and streams as well as slow flowing water in lowland forests. Water trumpet also exists in forest pools or river banks.

Water trumpets are commercially cultivated. The submersed water trumpet produces vegetatively while the emersed types flower and reproduce sexually. The Water trumpet can be very hard to cultivate, with only experts able to grow the species.

American Waterweed

The American Waterweed (scientific name Elodea) originated from the North American region and is a popular freshwater aquarium fixture. It lives entirely underwater, although it has a small white flower that blooms at the water surface. The said flower is then attached to the plant through a delicate stalk. The American Waterweed is propagated through cutting. It prospers on waters with a temperature of not more than 25 degrees Celsius with moderate to bright lighting.

Duckweed

The Duckweed (scientific name of Lemna Minor) is a group of monocot flowering plants lacking stem and leaves but characterized with a blade-like structure that floats under the surface of the water. It reproduces through budding. The Duckweed is an important source of food for waterfowl. In some parts of Southeast Asia it is also used as a food. It can provide shelter and nitrate removal when propagated in freshwater aquariums and ponds.

Water Lettuce

With a scientific name of Pistia, the Water Lettuce is able to survive in all fresh waterways. It floats on the water surface, with its roots submerged underneath its floating leaves. It has leaves that can stretch up to 14 cm in length. It does not have a stem and is colored light green. The flower of the Water Lettuce is hidden in the central part of the plant. The Water Lettuce can reproduce asexually. The Water Lettuce can become a hindrance in waterways, reducing its biodiversity while blocking gas exchange and in turn reducing oxygen in the waters.

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